A Quick Guide to Mixer Topologies

A Quick Guide to Mixer Topologies

Real-world mixers come in many flavors. Mini-Circuits offers hundreds of unique mixer models representing six different circuit topologies. The good news is that this variety gives designers options for just about every application requirement. The problem, albeit a high-class problem, is that understanding the differences between mixer designs can complicate the component selection process.
This article will provide a broad overview of the different mixer topologies, including both balanced and unbalanced architectures. It should be noted that, in theory, any nonlinear device can be used to make a mixer, but Schottky diodes and Field Effect Transistors (FETs) are the most common. Mini-Circuits designs both diode- and FET-based mixers, but the topologies here will be presented using diode mixers for simplicity. However, the same principles can be applied to other technologies as well.

A Primer on RF Semiconductors (MMICs)

A Primer on RF Semiconductors (MMICs)

A Primer on RF Semiconductors (MMICs) Radhakrishna Setty, Technical Advisor Introduction Semiconductors are ubiquitous in modern society. In addition to microprocessors for computing technologies, they are used in practically every active wireless communications system including cell phone towers, cell phones, radars and satellites to name a few. Mini-Circuits designs and produces several semiconductor-based (MMIC) components […]

Affordable Solutions for Testing 28 GHz 5G Devices with Your 6 GHz Lab Instrumentation

Affordable Solutions for Testing 28 GHz 5G Devices with Your 6 GHz Lab Instrumentation

The capabilities that define the 5G wireless standard will require utilization of wider bandwidths across more regions of spectrum than any current wireless technology.  5G communications will eventually occupy multiple bands from below 6 GHz to above 60 GHz.  For now, much of the development effort is divided among sub-6 GHz bands for vehicular connectivity and longer-range transmissions, and the 26, 28, 38 and 60 GHz bands for enhanced mobile broadband applications.  The migration to higher frequencies and the multi-band nature of the technology pose a variety of unique challenges for designers developing 5G devices and network equipment.  Significant among these is the high cost of instrumentation for test and measurement over such a wide range of frequencies.