MBT-283-DG+

MBT-283-DG+

Mini-Circuits’ MBT-283-DG+ is an ultra-wideband MMIC surface mount bias tee die covering applications from 1.5 GHz to 20 GHz with low insertion loss, excellent return loss, and high DC-RF isolation over its entire frequency range. This model is capable of handling up to +30 dBm (1W) RF input power and DC input current up to […]

Combining MMIC Reflectionless Filters to Create Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Bandpass Filters

Combining MMIC Reflectionless Filters to Create Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Bandpass Filters

Ultra-Wideband (UWB) radio is defined as any RF technology utilizing a bandwidth of greater than ¼ the center frequency or a bandwidth greater than 500 MHz [1] [2]. While UWB has been a known technology since the end of the nineteenth century, restrictions on transmission to prevent interference with narrow-band, continuous wave signals have limited its applications to defense and relatively few specially licensed operators [1]. In 2002, the FCC opened the 3.1 to 10.6 GHz band for commercial applications of Ultra-Wideband technology, and since then UWB has become a focus of academic study and industry research for a promising variety of emerging applications. To prevent interference with neighboring spectrum allocations like GPS at 1.6 GHz, the FCC has imposed specific rules for indoor and outdoor transmission of UWB signals, limiting transmissions in the permitted frequency range to power levels of -41 dBm/MHz or less.

Flattening Negative Gain Slope with MMIC Fixed Equalizers

Flattening Negative Gain Slope with MMIC Fixed Equalizers

Equalizers are devices used to compensate for negative gain slope in the frequency response of a wide variety of RF systems. Unlike a standard attenuator with a flat frequency response, an equalizer is a unique kind of attenuator which exhibits lower insertion loss as frequency increases with some known slope. This is a useful characteristic for system designers working in wideband applications where the gain response of circuit elements or of the entire RF chain often varies across frequency.

MMIC Amplifiers Stretch the Boundaries of Dynamic Range in VHF/UHF Communications

MMIC Amplifiers Stretch the Boundaries of Dynamic Range in VHF/UHF Communications

The noise figure and linearity of low noise amplifiers are critical factors in maximizing sensitivity and dynamic range in RF receiver design.  The amplifier noise figure determines the weakest signal the amplifier can discern, and the IP3 determines the degree to which intermodulation products from nearby signals interfere with the desired signal.  The lower the noise figure and the higher the IP3 of the amplifier at the receiver input, the greater the sensitivity and Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) of the receiver.